Grenfell in the Community

Let’s Talk Science volunteer Jasmine Pinksen demonstrating solutions density to children by adding different components and then adding grapes to see if they sank or floated; photo by D. Walsh
Let’s Talk Science volunteer Jasmine Pinksen demonstrating solutions density to children by adding different components and then adding grapes to see if they sank or floated; photo by D. Walsh

Grenfell Campus and Let’s Talk Science (LTS) partnered for the yearly Challenge that brings students from schools around the Western Newfoundland area into the university campus to exercise their curiosity.

Continue reading “Grenfell in the Community”

MATHEMATICIANS IN MEXICO

Research_Reports
Research Reports are submissions to our blog from Grenfell Campus researchers (faculty, staff, or student). Any views expressed are those of the author. You can check out our guidelines and submit your story here.
Submitted by Robert Bailey

Being a research mathematician is, in some respects, the ultimate “ivory tower” profession: essentially, it involves being paid to sit in a room and think.  But it’s not always that way: it’s a very international business, with researchers in one field being scattered in many countries across the world.  So it is not all that surprising that, for a week in September, I got to travel to the Casa Matemática Oaxaca in Oaxaca, Mexico.

Continue reading “MATHEMATICIANS IN MEXICO”

INSIGHT-BLOG Sound Bite: Tuesday Afternoon Student Research Presentations

In this INSIGHT-BLOG Sound Bite we interview three students, Nick O’Niell, Shihao Wu, and Brittany Pittman, who presented on their research at a recent series of student research presentations at Grenfell Campus.

Continue reading “INSIGHT-BLOG Sound Bite: Tuesday Afternoon Student Research Presentations”

The Multiple Dimensions of Codes

code-computer-cyberspace-225769

How do we ensure a message sent to a Mars Rover is received correctly, diminish the impact of information technology on the environment, and reduce the degradation of stored data? Solutions can, in part, be found in error-correcting codes which encode, pad out, or extend data in such a way that it becomes possible to inspect the encoded data later, finding and fixing any errors that have been introduced.

Robert Bailey and Daniel Hawtin are currently conducting work on combinatorics and group theory (the study of symmetry), and applications in error-correcting coding theory.

Continue reading “The Multiple Dimensions of Codes”